Waiting for the Light - Aaron Northcott


King of Birds

The Vermillion Gates

Importance of Research



Artist Antony Poynton

Snapsnap Strap Prototype


Connect with Aaron:



Click Here

to subscribe to the newsletter


Resources:


£25 Credit for Travel


Aaron on MSOX Blog:


Shooting Winter Wildlife

Focusing on Feathers

Photographing Wildlife



Waiting for the Light


It may seem like a straight-forward way of improving your photography, but waiting for the best lighting conditions is not always the easiest thing to do.


Many photography enthusiasts will be eagerly counting the days until their next holiday or weekend-break to travel far and wide, in the hope of capturing some incredible shots of lands-less-familiar . . . and I don’t blame you!


There are many incredible sights all over the world (including where you live right now!) but it is nearly always more inspiring to travel to a place you’ve not been before.

The temptation for everyone when traveling to somewhere new is to squeeze as many places, sights, and activities as possible into the time you have – which is great for the traveler in us all, but less so for the photographer!


I’m sure you’re already aware that the best time for many types of photography (especially landscapes) is normally either dusk, dawn, or in stormy weather.


When on holiday I’m not sure many people are going to be hoping for stormy weather, and it may even be unusual for a lot of people to be up and awake for the sunrise – presumably making dusk the most common time for some of the more memorable holiday shots. The normal routine for most travelers would be to travel to many different locations and spots throughout the day, taking photos at each breathtaking new view you pass . . . but so many of those photos could be so much better.

Now I know it isn’t always practical for everyone or every time, especially when on a trip with other people – but I’d really encourage you to take note of the most impressive sights and locations, and try to revisit them.


For example, if you know that you’re forecast bad weather in a day or two – chances are you’ll be able to capture some really unique images by going back to the locations you’ve already scoped out!


Afterall, who really goes sightseeing (especially with a camera) when the rain is pouring down? This is when you’ll take the most interesting, unique and memorable images.

Sometimes even by just revisiting later the same day you’ll take some lovely photographs, as the Sun slowly sinks behind the horizon – illuminating the sky and casting beautiful ambers, pinks and gold across the land . . . just because you were patient enough to wait.



Powered by SmugMug Log In