Not as Scary as it Sounds - Aaron Northcott


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Not as Scary as it Sounds


Not far from my home in Colchester, Essex there’s a small village called Dedham.


It’s a lovely, quaint place nestled among green farmed fields and besides the winding river Stour making it an altogether lovely spot to relax and unwind – which is exactly what I needed after the recent weeks of nonstop travelling, editing and photography.


There have been settlements traced back to the Bronze Age in Dedham and it was already a well established working village by the Middle Ages. This means that there is a wealth of history and interesting buildings, architecture and enchanting country lanes to explore (and photograph).

I also found a really interesting bit of information online about some of Dedham’s past residents that left the village in 1635 and became part of the group that would ultimately settle on the Western edge of the Massachusetts Bay Colony (which later became Boston, USA). This is where Dedham, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA inherits its name from!


Though I’ve often taken time to relax in Dedham (UK) – my time has mostly been spent exploring outside along the river where visitors to the village can hire rowing boats, wandering the narrow streets and admiring the sweeping landscapes of the English Countryside.


This time however, I found myself inside Dedham Church . . . no matter where I travel to, I always love to look inside (and photograph, if it’s allowed) the religious buildings I come across. Whether it’s a church, synagogue, mosque or temple there is nearly always some form of unique and beautiful architecture to capture, and the lighting in these big old buildings can be really interesting due to the large and often multi-coloured windows.


If the building is really old there will sometimes be different levels of both floor and ceiling as well, which can make for some tricky but really fantastic photography!



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